Sharing Events Another Way

In RootsTech 2021 Gaylon Findlay teaches a method for sharing events and their sources. It is located HERE. (Click This Link) It’s only 8 minutes long.

When I asked Gaylon some questions about this video, he said, “There are probably a thousand good ways to document this, and very few bad ways.” I have a lot of respect for Gaylon and for AQ. After a lot of thinking, I came up with far fewer than 10 ways. I’ll keep thinking about it though. If I find something good, I’ll post it on AQWillDo.

Meanwhile, this is one of the ways I thought of, and I like it. You may too.

Whenever I try something new or big or complicated, I like to make a backup of my file before I begin. Backups are inexpensive when compared to the alternative. They finish quickly and they are small. With a backup if I do something wrong, and I don’t know how to correct it or if I don’t want to spend the time and effort it would take to correct it, I can always restore the backup and start again.

Just a hint though! For this type of backup I alter the backup title. Normally, because of the settings I chose in
Tools -> Preferences -> Database, a backup of this file would be named
DeleteThisExampleFile 2021-03-20, 08-56.aqz
DeleteThisExampleFile 2021-03-20, 08-56 B4 Big Change.aqz
is what I would call it before a big change. The B4 part lets me quickly pick this backup from a list of backup files.

I believe that I learn faster by doing than by just observing, so this is a hands on lesson. Open your family file…

…and back it up. Lets get started.

Since I have done a less than stellar job of documenting my family file, I foresee this as a long project. Because of this, I want a way to identify people after I have searched for them on each census which occurred any time while they were Head of household. I will identify them using a Tag. That tag will be visible in the ‘Family’ view, the ‘Pedigree’ view and the ‘Descendants’ view.

That’s right. I will begin this project by selecting the people on my family file who are shown on a census as the ‘Head’ of house. (HoH) Each record of a residence in the census begins with a person almost always listed as ‘Head’ of the house. In some cases, such as an orphanage, this person is listed as ‘Officer’ ‘Matron’ or some other designation instead. Someone, however, is always listed first, and we will refer to that person as the ‘Head’ of the household.

The reason for beginning with people who are listed as ‘Head’ is to avoid duplication. In any given census year, a person will be listed as ‘Head’ ‘Spouse’ ‘Son’ ‘Daughter’ or some Other designation. I refer to those with an Other designation as Tenants. (That would be Grandma, Grandpa, Aunt, Uncle, Brother, Brother in law, Sister, Sister in law, Cousin, Neighbor, Friend, Employee, Unknown, Not Related, etc.) That’s everyone who would not be on the Family Group Record for the HoH and the Spouse shown in the ‘Pedigree’ view. It would be very unusual for one person to be listed as both ‘Head’ and also as anything else in one census year. (In the case of multiple marriages, you may or may not want to document other spouses and family.) Such a person would have to have, and be counted in, more than one residence. People on a census, but not listed as ‘Head’ will live in a residence where someone else is ‘Head’ and they will be counted at that residence in that census year.

Since we use the ‘Pedigree’ view to select our candidates for ‘Head’ of house, these are direct ancestors. We will start at the right of the pedigree and move left to right and top to bottom. That means we will be checking for both males and females to see if they are listed as ‘Head’ of house. If a person is found as anything other than ‘Head’ during any census year, we will not process that person in that residence. We will account for that person in that year by finding them in the residence where someone else is the ‘Head’ of house that year. I will begin with my dad because at age 74, I am too young to be on the most recent, US 1940 Census, so even though all my children have moved away, I am not yet HoH on any census that has been released. That will be true for almost all of you. (Add 72 to your age when you were first HoH in a census and see how old you would have to be.)

Click on ‘Tools’ and select ‘Tags…’ from the menu.

Click on the ‘Show Tag Placeholders’ checkbox to fill it with a check. This makes working with Tags easier. You can access Tags without going to a menu. Just one click on either a tag or a tag placeholder, and you are there. Click the ‘Define Tags’ button.

Select an unused tag and name your tag ‘HoH Census Search Completed’ and then make a ‘No Census Records Found’ tag while you are at it.

When you have searched for all of the census records for a person, locate that person in ‘Pedigree’ view, the ‘Family’ view or the ‘Descendants’ view.

Click on the tag placeholder or an existing tag.

AQ will bring up the ‘Manage Tags’ screen. Click on the ‘HoH Census Search Completed’ tag, then click on the ‘Set’ button for the selected person.

Since I will be looking at many families, I need a system which is orderly and inclusive, and I want to track my progress. As such I will use my ‘Pedigree’ view as my primary guide. As an overall rule I will search households from left to right and top to bottom on the ‘Pedigree view. If Dad is in a census, but not Head of Household, he will be a spouse, a child, or a tenant where someone else is the Head of Household. In theory, everyone should appear on a census in one of these positions if they are living at the time of the census. The reason for only processing a census for the chosen person if he/she is HoH is to avoid duplication. If he/she is not HoH that year, then he/she should appear in another household where someone else is HoH, and he/she will be counted there.

As the process travels from the top to the bottom of the ‘Pedigree’ view, we will be looking for both males and females as HoH. Process her census record whenever she is shown as HoH. HoH is a gender neutral position in the census. Note that in the image above, I do not process my mother, nor either of my grandmothers. This is NOT because they are female, but because in the latest census available, the US 1940 Census, they were listed as Spouse because their husbands were still alive.

Just before I begin searching for the census records of my great-grandparents, My ‘Pedigree’ view will look like this. Three are red-tagged because I searched them, one because I am too young and three because I knew they were never HoH before the 1950 census, which is not available as of this writing.

In his video, Gaylon Findlay teaches us how to use event sharing and the freeform source as a means to shorten the time and effort required to document the information found on a census for a particular household. Typically this would be a family, but often it includes others living in the house. In this lesson we will create a Census event and verify the Date and Location using the US Census as the source. We will then share this Census event with all of the residents in the household, be they family or tenants, as long as they are found somewhere on our family file. I use the Census event rather than the Residence event to demonstrate the versatility of the sharing process. Gaylon has shown the use of the Residence event. I also use the Census event because I more closely associate the Census Source with the Census Event.

It is a really good idea to have your family file open in AQ, have this lesson open in your browser, and have a separate window or tab for the internet searches you will be doing. Your browser can separate this lesson from the internet searches either with tabs or by pulling one of the tabs to a separate window. It really helps to be able to find all three quickly using the icons on the taskbar or the tabs in the browser.

I highlight my father then click on the Internet tab and select ‘Search Ancestry.com’ to do a General Search. In this lesson all of the searches will be to Ancestry.com. You could search elsewhere, like FamilySearch, but then the process would vary from what is shown here. I’ll leave it up to you to first learn how to do the process, then figure out the differences for yourself. Just a hint: If you intend to use more than one vendor for your searches, and you intend to switch between vendors in a given census, you will need to copy both types of citation information (Demonstrated later) each time you switch vendors in that census. You will also need to change Repository information if you are tracking that.

Ancestry.com returns this general search of my father. Note that there is a link to a record which shows his name, the name of his father, but with his mother’s maiden name, and his daughter’s name. That must be him? We will click on that link to see if it is.

This screen was returned by the search, and surprise, it really is him. Note that on the right side of the screen there is a column labeled Suggested Records. The third entry in that column is for the US 1940 Census, where Dad was the Head of House. There may be many links to your chosen person in this column, so take a few seconds to scroll down and see if you can find census records for the years when your person may have been HoH. We will click on that third Suggested Record link.

This is what we were looking for. It is the transcript of the US 1940 Census. He is the HoH in this census record. Often, as is the case here, there is a link to a photo of the actual census page. We will right-click this link because we are going to use the URL for this transcript page later. I want to be able to switch back and forth between the transcription of the census page and the photo of the census page.

Did you find a census record as HoH for your first person? If not, try the next person in order from your ‘Pedigree’ view and search until you do, then continue with us. Remember to tag any for whom you have made a complete search whether you found the results you wanted or not.

At the top of the census page photo we find the information which we will now enter into our Census event.

I don’t have a 1940 census event for Dad so I click the ‘Add’ button. In the next window (superimposed) I highlight the ‘Census’ event and click the ‘Select’ button. If for some reason I already had a ‘Census’ event for that year, I would probably want to Edit it so I could determine whether it had everything I need. If it doesn’t I can delete that event and build a new one following the instructions below.

I enter the Date and Place information from the census, and I click on the Source’ button.

A little history here. Several years ago when I was just figuring out how to do ‘Events’ and ‘Sources’ I decided to pre-build all of the census sources I was likely to need. I Googled to find what census information was available in each country I expected to use. I didn’t take the time to get all the citation information for each census. I figured I could wait until I actually needed a particular country and year, and fill it in then. That’s working out well.

But, for this lesson I wanted to show how to build the event and the source, so I deleted what I already had for the US 1940 Census source from the Source List. That’s why the most recent census is the only one that’s not there for the US. I guess I could remove the Scotland 2001 Census and the Scotland 2011 Census from my list because those records will not be released until after the year 2100.

This is where we create a source. The steps are numbered.

1st, I make sure that the source type is Census.

2nd, I assign a level of relative quality to the event. I have been generous. The person who answers the questions may not be the Head or Spouse, or in some cases not even a family member. The census taker may not know anyone at this residence. Sometimes people change how they spell their names, or can’t remember what year some of the children were born. Sometimes it’s the census taker who can’t spell. My sister had an alternate spelling for her given name until sometime in grade school. As long as I have been alive she has never spelled it the way it was correctly spelled on the 1940 census. If you have much experience with census records, you already know about these types of things.

3rd, I like things to be consistent! There are a few different ways to title a census. I could have said:

Census 1940 US
or
Census US 1940

That would work, but AQ already lets me filter by type so that I see just the type I want to choose from. In this case, Census. I could have said:

1940 US Census

That would work, but then the list would be grouped together by year and sorted within year by country. A long list of little clumps of records from around the world.

1940 Census US

That would actually give me the same list as 1940 US Census. That leaves:

US Census 1940
or
US 1940 Census

Country Year Type. That’s what I like, so I built them all into the Source List at once so that I wouldn’t slip up and change the order later. Now I can find a census source for a particular year from any country in moments. You don’t need to do all that. It’s just my Obsessive Compulsive Tendency, not Disorder, I can still function normally without doing these things.

4th, I click in the Short Title box, and AQ copies down what I have entered as the Title. Next, if needed, I go back up and add little extra bits of information to the title. Go back 2 images and look at the Edit Source List. Notice that it is sorted by Full Title. Here is the same list sorted by Short Title.

Now where were we? Oh, Yes!

5th, there is a ‘Repository’ button. If you click it, you will have the option of selecting from items you have already placed on the ‘Repository List’ or you can add a repository. You can read about Repositories in the User’s Guide. A repository helps someone else find where you found your information.

6th, click on the ‘Freeform’ checkbox, then do this:

Scroll to the bottom of the Census transcript and copy the ‘Original Data’ text.

Paste the text into the ‘Full Reference’ box then click the ‘OK’ button. This will put the US 1940 Census into your Source List.

Scroll to the bottom of the Census transcript, and copy the ‘Census Place’ text from the ‘Source Citation.’

Now that the US 1940 Census is in the list, you can click the ‘Select’ button.

Enter the – Name comma Head of House comma space – then paste in the rest of the information which you just copied. As you do, the information in the ‘Sample Footnote’ box will also change. There you can see the citation in its final form.

The US 1940 Census source already contains the information you first copied five images ago from the ‘Original data’ area of the ‘Source Citation’ so you will not need to copy that again. From now on when you cite the US 1940 Census for another household, you will just copy the information from the ‘Census Place’ and paste it after the ‘Name comma Head of House comma space ‘ which you will enter.

Click the ‘Attach’ button.

I told you that we would use the URL from our Census transcript. In this window, use the ‘Item Type’ pull down window to select the word Document, copy the URL from the top of the Census transcript screen, and paste it into the ‘Filename or URL’ box, then click the ‘OK’ button.

You could have done that a different way. You could have done a screen shot of the census page, saved that image where you keep the rest of your images, and left the word Photo in the ‘Item Type’ pull down window. Then you would place the path and file name for that image into the ‘Filename or URL’ box. The difference is that the ‘Document’ version references a URL and the ‘Photo’ version references an image.

Now you see the ‘Attachment’ window is not empty. If you click the ‘View’ button, AQ will display the census page, either as a photo or a web page. Click the ‘OK’ button.

Now there is as asterisk on the ‘Source’ button, showing that there is a source for this event. It’s time to share this event with everyone else who is on that census page.

We are going to add the family of the HoH, so click the ‘Add Family’ button.

We don’t want the family of the HoH when he/she was a child, so we select the family where the HoH is shown with the Spouse who is the parent of the children on the Census page.

In this case two of the children were not born yet at the time of the census, so we will uncheck their names. If an older child or the spouse had died before the census, we would also uncheck those names.

If there are others on the census page who are not in the family you selected, you can use the ‘Add Selected Individuals’ button to access them using the Advanced Filter/Focus, and also share the event with them.

The event is ready to be shared, so we click the ‘OK’ button and continue our journey through our ‘Pedigree’ view. If there are other censuses where this person is HoH, process them the same way you did this one. If not, click on the Tag Placeholder or an already existing tag for the HoH, and highlight the ‘HoH Census Search Completed’ tag and click the ‘Set’ button.

It’s up to you how many of your relatives you want to document with census records. Please note that what we have done in the ‘Pedigree’ view search includes only direct ancestors and their immediate families. With the possible exception of others who resided with the HoH, and are also on the Family File.

When you move far enough along the ‘Pedigree’ view that you reach a person who has no census records, check the parents to be sure they have none either, then tag that first one with a ‘No Census Records Found’ tag. Maybe a check for the earliest census records in their area would tell you why.

If you want to be thorough, I suggest that you choose this next approach after you finish with your ‘Pedigree’ view search. Search the term “Census years in ______’ and fill in the blank with the name of a country, or other area, where you have ancestors. There is no need to search for ancestors who died before census records existed where they lived.

Try this. During your ‘Pedigree’ view search, you tagged some ancestors with the ‘No Census Records Found’ tag. For each of them select the ‘Descendant’ view. From here on, use the ‘Descendants’ view as your guide. Travel down the ‘Descendants’ view generation by generation just as you traveled up the ‘Pedigree’ view. Level 1 is children and their spouses. Level two is Grandchildren and their spouses, level 3 is great-grandchildren and their spouses. You decide how many generation levels you want to process. Remember that you still process only those years when they are ‘Head’ of their household. As you complete the descendants for each ancestor with a ‘No Census Records Found’ tag, remove that tag and move to the next ‘No Census Records Found’ tagged ancestor.

Are you young enough to complete this task?

What topic would you like to see next?

Virtual Booth Tour 2021

This was a first. RootsTech was totally virtual. Over a million people registered to participate.

Ancestral Quest was a Bronze Sponsor of the event.

In RootsTech 2021 AQ had a Virtual Booth filled with information and ideas. If you have ever wanted to know how to use Ancestral Quest more effectively, this is a great place to look. Below is a guided tour of the RootsTech Ancestral Quest experience. Here Gaylon Findlay examines in detail many of the things AQWillDo. RootsTech has indicated that these links will be available until they are replaced by RootsTech 2022, so use the available time wisely. If the number to the left of the video link is highlighted, then that number is a link to the discussion of the video in AQWillDo. Click the highlighted number to see the discussion.

Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Category
RootsTech 2021 . . . . . 1 RootsTech 2021 Available through most of 2021
Ancestral Quest . . . . . 1 Ancestral Quest Virtual Booth
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 1 Ancestral Quest-Family Tree Software (Overview) 4:58
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 2 Timelines to Assist Research-Complete Guide 9:01
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 3 Fan Charts – Created by Ancestral Quest 4:25
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 4 TreeTips – Research Assistance Built into AQ (Full Guide) 19:57
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 5 TreeTips Research Assistance (Case Study) 16:57
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 6 Research Assistance Tools of Ancestral Quest 10:37
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 7 Sync Family Search and Your AQ Family File 19:09
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 8 Sync FamilySearch & Your AQ File Using Ancestral Quest 8:13
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 9 Freeform Sources 8:43
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 10 Sharing Events and Sources 7:55
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 11 Background Images for Charts 4:57
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 12 Intro to Syncing Sources from FamilySearch 4:58
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 13 Memories Manager in Ancestral Quest 9:25
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 14 Color Coding in Ancestral Quest 7:29
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 15 Add/Remove Country Name in Place Names 2:36
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 16 Ancestral Quest in Other Languages 3:15
Booth Demos . . . . . . . 17 Mapit 2:34
Discover More . . . . . . 18 Ancestral Quest Program Description
Discover More . . . . . . 18-1 Feature List
Discover More . . . . . . 18-2 Ancestral Quest for Mac
Discover More . . . . . . 18-2-1 Not Authorized (Mac)
Discover More . . . . . . 18-3 Version History
Discover More . . . . . . 18-4 View the System Requirements
Discover More . . . . . . 18-5 Details on the Free AQ Basics
Discover More . . . . . . 18-6 Purchase Ancestral Quest
Discover More . . . . . . 19 Learning Center See —-> (What Will AQ Do?)
Discover More . . . . . . 20 PAF User Information
Discover More . . . . . . 20-1 More Info
Discover More . . . . . . 20-2 Ancestral Quest Basics (Free Version)
Discover More . . . . . . 20-3 Options to Work with PAF
Discover More . . . . . . 21 Discover More
Discover More . . . . . . 21-1 Value of a Personal Database Part II: Case Study 17:12
Discover More . . . . . . 21-2 Syncing AQ/PAF Data with Family Tree (Basics) 28:49
Discover More . . . . . . 21-3 Syncing AQ/PAF Data with Family Tree (Advanced)
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4 Translating Ancestral Quest Screens 4:26
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-1 Overview 1:06
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-2 Create Language File 1:06
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-3 Example 1 – Buck/Doe 2:48
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-4 Organization of Translation Screen 11:58
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-5 Example 2 – Contact Info 4:03
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-6 Example 3 – Family View 13:04
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-7 Example 4 – Multiple Layouts 1:25
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-8 Example 5 – Pedigree Chart 4:06
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-9 Installing a Language File 2:49
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-10 Sharing a Language File 3:34
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-11 Handling Updates 10:40
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-12 Advanced Topics 17:45
Discover More . . . . . . 21-4-13 Summary 0:55
Discover More . . . . . . 22 Online Brochure
Discover More . . . . . . 23 Cues and Clues for AQ (Blog)
Discover More . . . . . . 24 Ancestral Quest Basics to Ancestral Quest Comparison Chart

Keep watching to see which white numbers will be highlighted.

If you do not yet follow AQWillDo, look to the right and scroll to the box labeled ‘Follow AQWillDo’ and click it. Follow the directions and receive each new posting.

What Will AQ Do?

If you are a Follower of AQWillDo then you probably agree with me that Ancestral Quest is a Great Genealogical (Family History) program. It’s great enough that other programs got their start by licensing the Ancestral Quest code as the base for their own program. PAF (Personal Ancestral File) switched from an MS-DOS program to a Windows program this way. You may also have heard about Ancestry.com. Similar story.

AQ was the first desktop genealogy program to pass all the tests, and certify for use with FamilySearch.

So, how well do you know Ancestral Quest? Did you know that there is a Learning Center in AQ? This Learning Center can help you to learn what AQWillDo.

Click on the Help tab and select ‘Video Tutorial’ from the menu.

Open your copy of AQ and find the Learning Center. Scroll down to see how much is available. And what you see, that’s not all. Some of the links on the Learning Center page lead to other pages which themselves have links. It can get confusing, so here is a list of links to most of the videos, instruction pages and recorded classes found through the Learning Center as of 11 Mar 2021. I hope I didn’t miss any. These are clickable links, so try them out. If the number to the left of the video link is highlighted, then that number is a link to the discussion of that video in AQWillDo.

Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Category
Learning Center . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Learning Center
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Feedback
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 FAQs
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Tips & Tricks
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Using Removable Media
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Where to Find Genealogical Information
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Wall Chart
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 Pruning and Grafting your Tree
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 Documenting Your Sources
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Sharing Your Family Made Easy
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Quick Data Entry
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Organizing Your Paper Files
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Entering Special Characters (Win/Mac)
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Upgrading to AQ 16 from Earlier Versions
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 AQ – Uninstall & Reinstall
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 YouTube Channel
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AQ 16 Features
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AQ 15 Features
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AQ 14 Features
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Overview Video Tutorial
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Quick Start Video Tutorial
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Overview
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 First Time Startup Screens
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Quick Start – Entering a Family
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 Individual Entry
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 Family Entry Revisited
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Importing a GEDCOM File
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Working with Sources
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Scrapbooking
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Backup and Restore
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Conclusion
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Video Interview at Mesa Family History Expo – 2013
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TreeTips Research Assistance (Complete Guide)
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TreeTips Research Assistance (Case Study)
V16 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 AQ 16 Features
V15 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 AQ 15 Features
V14 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 AQ14 Video Tutorial
V14 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 AQ14 New Features
V14 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Update AQ14 Screenshots
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Organization of these Training Videos
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Setting a Password on AQ
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Finding People and Defining Groups
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Getting Help with AQ
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Printing Descendant Charts/Viewing Descendants
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Analyzing Relationships
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Setting Home Person and Using Bookmarks
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Printing Large Charts
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Source Images
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Updating AQ
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Family Reunion Contacts
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Report and Chart Destinations
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Opening Multiple Databases
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Potpourri
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Publishing a Family Book
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Uploading Pictures to Internet
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 What do Dual Dates ie 1701/1702 Mean?
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Backups and Collaboration
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Syncing AQ/PAF Data with Family Tree (Basics)
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Using AQ as a Research Tool
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Syncing AQ/PAF Data with Family Tree (Advanced)
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Questions and Answers
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 New Features in AQ14
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Finding, Reserving and Tracking LDS Ordinances
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 General Questions
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 Setting a Password on AQ
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Tips on Speeding up Imports from Family Tree
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3 Syncing Notes between your AQ/PAF file and FSFT
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Syncing Sources between your AQ/PAF file and FSFT
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Finding People / Defining Groups
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Finding People and Defining Groups
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2 ORTS Tips – Ordinance Reservation and Tracking System
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3 Getting Help with AQ
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4 ORTS Tips – Ordinance Reservation and Tracking System
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5 Importing Family Lines from Family Tree
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 Handling Changing PIDs of FamilySearch
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Printing Descendant Charts / Viewing Descendants
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Analyzing Relationships / General Questions
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Analyzing Relationships
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2 Setting Home Person and Using Bookmarks
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3 Automatically Link All Records with FamilySearch
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 Printing Large Charts
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5 Handling LDS Ordinances
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6 Source Images
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Updating AQ
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Family Reunion / Family Books / Photos to Internet
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Organization of Training Videos
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2 Family Reunion Contacts
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 Report and Chart Destinations
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4 Opening Multiple Databases
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5 Potpourri
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Publishing a Family Book
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Uploading Pictures to Internet
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8 Answering Questions Before Reserving LDS Ordinances
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Standardized Place Names (FamilySearch)
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1 Selecting Standardized Places for FSFT
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 What do Dual Dates ie 1701-1702 Mean?
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3 Backups and Collaboration
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4 Get a List of Ancestors Who Turned 110 Years Last Year
Recorded Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5 Potpourri
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Overview – Video
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Overview – Screen Shots
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Syncing AQ/PAF Data with Family Tree (Basics)
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Syncing AQ/PAF Data with FSFT (Advanced)
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Link and Sync Individuals
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Finding Duplicates in FamilySearch Family Tree
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Upload Data to Family Tree
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Advanced Handling of FamilySearch Sources
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Memories Manager
FamilySearch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Finding Names for Temple Submission
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Tips on Speeding Up Imports from Family Tree
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Syncing Notes between Your AQ/PAF file and Family Tree
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Syncing Sources between Your AQ/PAF file and Family Tree
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Importing Family Lines from Family Tree
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Handling Changing PIDs of FamilySearch
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Automatically Link All Records with FamilySearch
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Selecting Standardized Places for FSFT
ORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Full Training – Video
ORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Intro to the set of videos
ORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Overview of the Reserve/Create Batches Screen
ORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Identifying/Adding Potential Records
ORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Qualifying
ORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Manage Batches
ORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Overview Video
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Finding, Reserving and Tracking LDS Ordinances
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Using ORTS, Ordinance Reservation and Tracking System
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Handling LDS Ordinances
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Answering Questions before Reserving LDS Ordinances
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Get a List of Ancestors Who Turned 110 Years Last Year
Classroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Potpourri
Ungrouped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Convert to AQ from PAF

Index of Topics for This Class

That’s just under a hundred and thirty links to videos and instruction pages which can help you use Ancestral Quest more effectively.

In the list above, if the number to the left of the video link is highlighted, then that number is a link to the discussion of the video in AQWillDo.

The next AQWillDo post will have the links from the Ancestral Quest Virtual Booth at RootsTech Connect 2021. Following posts will examine some of these Learning Center and Virtual Booth videos. If you are not a Follower of AQWillDo find the box on the right which says ‘Follow AQWillDo’ and click on it. Follow the instructions, and you will receive posts of AQWillDo in your email.

FamilySearch has Duplicates?

There are approximately 8 billion records of individuals on the public FamilySearch Family Tree. (Hereinafter referred to as FS Tree) Some of them are duplicates. That is, records referring to the same person, but with slightly different information. Some duplicate records may even contain the same information.

How do the duplicates get there? It’s easy. Either one person enters a record for a given person two or more times without checking to see if the information is already there, or two or more people enter information on the same person without checking to see if the information is already there.

Is that a problem? They have enough storage space for 8 billion records, so it is reasonable to believe that they have planned ahead, and have more storage space available. If they run out of space, they can always buy more hardware.

So why is it important to find and remove duplicates? Let’s say that Jonathan V. Doe was born 3 May 1721 in the town of Fordwich, Kent, England, population 381. Lets also say that over time 416 people enter Jonathan into the FS Tree. Now lets say that 364 of those 416 people checked to see if Johathan’s information was already there. The first one found that there was no record for Johathan and the other 363 found that first record and either used it as it was, or added to the information known about Jonathan. They did not use, or merge, any other records for Jonathan.

That leaves 52 people who, at some time, each entered a new record for Jonathan V. Doe, born 3 May 1721 in the town of Fordwich, Kent, England, population 381. Some entered him as Jon V. Doe, some as John V. Doe, Some as Jonathen Doe, some as John Doe, some as John, some as Jon. Some entered the date as 8 Feb 1721, some as 3 Mar 1721, and some were sure that Fordwich was really in Shropshire.

Still, that is only 52 extra records in a database holding 8 billion. Why is that important? Here’s why. There are now 53 records for Jonathan. There are 53 opportunities for people to extend the line with both ancestors and descendants. There are up to 53 individuals or groups of people doing the same research, but for different versions of Jonathan. Those 53 groups could have been spending their time productively rathar than wasting their time doing research which would have been available to them if only they had known that it was already there. Jonathan is probably not the only person on the FS Tree with more than one record referring to him. Duplicate records invite duplicate (wasted) research and wasted space.

As we reduce the number of duplicate records by combining multiple versions of the same individual, we slow down the increase in the size of the FS Tree, and we increase the linage-linked aspect of the records. That allows us to take advantage of research done by other people by connecting our reseach to theirs.

Incline Software has a video where Gaylon Findlay describes how a person can create a database which he calls DuplicateFinder.aq. This file is used to help find duplicate FS Tree records cooresponding to the records on a local family file. I don’t know the name of your family, so I will refer to your family file as (Family).aq.

Before I show this video to you, let me emphasize that under NO circumstances should you actually use your (Family).aq file instead of the DuplicateFinder.aq file. All links to the records in FS Tree will be removed from the DuplicateFinder.aq file you are using. If you use your (Family).aq file instead of the DuplicateFinder.aq file you will destroy all of the links you had to the FS Tree. The only two ways to recover that information are by restoring a backup of the (Family).aq file or by re-linking records individually.

Here is how Gaylon created the DuplicateFinder.aq file.

In my posting ‘Find the Dead‘ I described my Centerville.aq file. This file is not the typical (Family).aq file because I have a very high percentage of living people there. It would be an unnecessary waste of time and internet traffic for me to ask AQ to send queries for all of those living people up to FamilySearch just to have them sent back down to me as living people, about whom they can supply no information. So I decided to take a different approach to creating my own DuplicateFinder.aq file.

Stats for the Centerville.aq file.

If you intend to follow along with this process using your (Family).aq file, do this NOW.

Open your (Family).aq file, and MAKE A BACKUP NOW.

Here is what to do after your backup.

From your (Family).aq file click on the ‘File’ tab and select ‘Save As…’ from the menu.

Name the new file. This is an intermediate file which will later be discarded, so name it appropriately. I chose the name ‘Intermediate’ because it is meaningful to me. Click the ‘Save’ button.

STOP

Close the (Family).aq file and open the intermediate file.

Click on the ‘Tools’ tab and select ‘Preferences’ from the menu.

Click on the ‘Database’ tab. Enter the name of your interim file in the ‘Title’ box. I do this so that the top line of the AQ screen will show the Title of the interim file, not the Title of the (Family).aq file. I like all the visual clues I can get.

Off the subject for just a moment, if you configure the name of your backup files as illustrated above, the backups will be grouped in the File Explorer window by (Family) name, and within that, they will be listed chronologically by the date and time of the backup. If you keep multiple copies of backups it’s nice to see them listed in order. The most recent backup of any file will be at the top or bottom of its (Family) group. Your choice.

Click the ‘OK’ button.

In the interim file click on the ‘FamilySearch’ tab and select ‘Unlink Individuals(s)…’ from the menu.

Check again by looking at the bottom right of your screen, and be sure that you are not in your (Family).aq file. You don’t want to make a mistake here. Click on the ‘All Individuals in File’ radio button, then click on the ‘Unlink’ button.

AQ warns you that you are about to remove all links to the FS Tree, and asks if you are sure. Click the ‘Yes’ button.

AQ confirms that the links in the records were removed, and tells you how many links there were. Click on the ‘OK’ button. Your interim file now has no links the the FS Tree.

Click on the ‘Search’ tab at the top of the screen and select ‘Advanced Filter/Focus…’ from the menu.

We are about to remove the records for all individuals whom Ancestral Quest does not recognize as ‘Deceased’ because we don’t want to try to process records which we know FamilySearch will not allow us to know about. Be certain that the ‘Selections by Relationship’ drop down box is set to ‘Individual’ then click on the ‘Define’ button.

Scroll down the ‘Possible Fields’ list and select ‘Deceased'(1) from the menu. Push(2) it into the ‘Current Filter’ and select the ‘Is not'(3) radio button. Click on ‘OK'(4) in the ‘Deceased Field Filter’ window.

Click on the ‘OR’ button, then continue.

In my file I have used the word ‘Dead’ in the ‘Death Date’ to indicate that I do not know whether the person is living or dead. If I know the person is not living, but I don’t know the ‘Death Date’ I enter ‘Deceased’ in that field. AQ accepts either value in the ‘Death Date’ field, and in response to either it places the gray FamilySearch icon on the Family and Pedigree views. For any person with ‘Dead’ in their Death Date, I can click on the icon and see if FS Tree believes they have died. Since almost all of these will be living, I don’t want those records in my interim file. I will add them to this ‘Current Filter’ to be removed with those who are not identified as Deceased by Ancestral Quest.

Scroll down the ‘Possible Fields’ list and select ‘Death Date'(1) from the menu. Push(2) it into the ‘Current Filter’ and select ‘Contains'(3) from the drop down box. Enter ‘Dead’ into the ‘Date’ box. (4) Click on the ‘OK'(5) button in the ‘Death Date Field Filter’ window.

Click on the ‘OR’ button, then continue.

Select ‘Name'(1) from the ‘Possible Fields’ menu. Push(2) it into the ‘Current Filter’ and select the ‘Surname Only'(3) radio button. Select ‘Does not exist'(4) from the drop down box. Click on the ‘OK'(5) button in the ‘Name Field Filter’ then click on the ‘OK'(6) button in the ‘Search for Individual/Marriage’ window, then continue.

Click on the ‘Show results only'(1) checkbox. Click on the ‘Delete'(2) button. The Yes/No(3) box will appear. Click on the ‘Yes'(4) button. Click on the ‘OK'(5) button in the ‘Search for Individual’ window.

That removed the living from the file, but that leaves us with gaps in the RIN numbers where records of the living were removed. It will be more convenient to have consecutive RIN numbers, so we must renumber the records.

Stats for the Intermediate.aq file.

I now have a DuplicateFinder.aq file with RINs ranging from 1 to 10955. This will allow me to more efficiently remove duplicates from FS Tree.

Since I have fewer than 11,000 records to work with in a file with 18964 RINs, I know I don’t want to do it all at once. I will break it into smaller groups of 50 records. I will also open a DupFindCount.txt file where I will record the starting and ending RINs for the next batch to put through the system. That way, I can stop at any time, including in the middle of a 50 record batch, and come back later to start over. If I didn’t complete the last batch I worked on, I will just run it through again.

Here is how I will get rid of RINs that are in my Deleted RIN List. This is a list of formerly used RINS of deleted records. The Rins are waiting to be reused. I don’t want any wasted space in my 50 record batches, so I will compact my IntermediateFinder.aq file into a DuplicateFinder.aq file with no unused RINs.

Click on the ‘Export’ icon at the top ledt of the screen. We need only vital statistics, so lets not export unneeded information. Uncheck all items in the ‘Include’ box, Click on the ‘All’ radio button, then click on the ‘Export’ button.

Click the ‘OK’ button.

Stats for DuplicateFinder.aq.

Here is a link to the full ‘Find Duplicate Records on FamilySearch‘ video, where you can learn how to make those removals for FS Tree records matching your ancestors.

Here is a link to the ‘Ancestral Quest Learning Center‘ webpage.

Roots Tech Connect 2021

It is finally here. Roots Tech Connect 2021. In the past there have been many reasons to not attend Roots Tech. Too far away, too expensive, too inconvenient, just to name a few. Who could take 1-3 days off work and travel to Salt Lake City, Utah?

Now the excuses are gone! It isn’t too far away, it’s on your Desktop, Laptop, Tablet, or Phone. It isn’t too expensive, it’s FREE. It isn’t inconvenient. Even though the event is listed as being held 25 Feb 2021 – 27 Feb 2021, the presentations will all be available at least until Roots Tech 2022 begins.

https://www.familysearch.org/rootstech/rtc2021 is the URL to get you there, or click the link above.

ADDENDUM

Well, RootsTech is over, but the links to the venders are still available. I haven’t heard an actual final date, but as I said, I have heard some say that it should be available until RootsTech2022 takes its place. The link above is still active, and it points to the URL listed above.

If you go to the Expo Hall and scroll down, you will see that Ancestral Quest is one of the Bronze Sponsors. If you click that icon it will take you to the Ancestral Quest Virtual Booth. When you are there, click on the Connect button on the lower right corner. That’s where you can join a chat room of people interested in AQ. If you instead click on Direct Messages and scroll down from there, you will see a list of people registered for RootsTech who are related to you. You can click on them and chat with them. They will see your message when they next login to RootsTech.

If you continue to scroll down you will see an invitation to view the ‘Map of My Relatives.’ Here you will see how many of those who registered for RootsTech are related to you. You will also see some of them listed along the left side of the screen. Click on one and you will see that you can Send a Message, View Relationship or Add Friend. View Relationship shows the relative you clicked, then it travels up that ancestry as many as 12 generations, looking for a relative common to both of you. When found, it travels down the other leg of the ladder to show you at the bottom. You can send messages to relatives you may not know, and start a new friendship. You can add relatives to a Friend List. I tried it, but I don’t know yet how to find my Friends List. Let me know if you have had better luck.

One caveat. To use all of the features you must have an account at FamilySearch, and you must be logged on to FamilySearch and RootsTech to get all features to work.

Use the User’s Guide

Incline Software produces a book called Ancestral Quest User’s Guide. It is available in the United States as a paperback, and around the world as a PDF file. It has 545 pages. I use it when I need to understand how to do some of the less common things that AQ Will Do.

If you would like to own this manual, you can get it from this website:

http://www.ancquest.com/orderonline.htm#AQ16BM (This is a link)

When the screen appears, scroll down to the section labeled Training Aids for Ancestral Quest.

My computer isn’t close to my book cases, so I buy this book in PDF format. I keep it and its predecessors in the C:/Data/AQ/Manual/ path.

My memory isn’t what it was when I was younger, and I don’t like searching around to find where my manual is, so I let AQ go get it for me.

My last post described how to get AQ to search with Google for obituaries. AQ passes a string to your browser, and the browser executes the string. Typically we think of the browser as a way to access the internet, but that isn’t all it can do. It can also access files on the computer’s file system.

You have probably seen references to websites which begin with the characters http://. The http stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol. Browsers can also execute strings beginning with file://. One such statement might be:

file://C:/Data/AQ/Manual/AQ16_UsersGuide.pdf

This is the string we will use to access the Ancestral Quest User’s Guide. The process is just like the process we used to access the Google website, but this time we will go, not to the internet, but to the hard drive, or some other device known to the file system.

To begin, click on the Internet tab at the top of your AQ screen, then select the Favorite Sites menu item. When the My Favorite Web Sites screen appears, click on the Add button. The Add/Edit Favorite Site screen appears.

Fill in the Title and URL boxes. Note that the Search this site** checkbox is not checked, so AQ will pass this string directly to the browser.

You will probably need to change the string in the URL box because the path to the folder where you store your User’s Guide will not be the same as mine. Store the guide wherever you want, but put the path to the file between the file:// and the AQ16_UsersGuide.pdf.

When the User’s Guide opens, you can use the <CTRL>F keys to find any topic contained in the book. The ^ and ˅ characters will allow you to skip through the text to prior or next occurance of the desired word(s).

When AQ comes out with a new major version and a new User’s Guide, you can buy the guide, and store it in the same folder with the older version, then click the Internet tab and select the Favorite Sites menu item. There you can click the modify button and update the name of the file.

Find the Dead

Years ago a gentleman moved to Centerville and was later called as the Bishop of the Centerville 1st Ward. Mom and Dad were visiting with him one evening, and Mom advised him that he should never say anything negative about anyone from Centerville to anyone else from Centerville because they were probably related. She was only half joking.

When Mom told me about that, I suggested that we start an AQ file of the people we know in Centerville, then trace their ancestry to see if we find any surprises. This was the origin of my Centerville.aq file. The resualt is that I have a file with very many people who all lived at one time in one general locality.

The file grew as I added the entire 1964 graduating class of my high school, and again as I added the names of all of the students in Centerville Elementary School class photos for myself and my siblings.

I have also found elementary school class photos for three of my uncles, my father and my mother, and I am adding the names of the students whom I recognize from those photos.

Eventually I will add those photos to the Memories section in FamilySearch.org for ONE identified deceased individual in each photo, and tag the other known deceased individuals as I find them. Suddenly families will discover school class photos of a recently deceased family member showing up in Memories. This may inspire them to tag other deceased class members whom they recognize. This could create the genealogical equivelant of “going viral.”

One problem with this scenario is finding which students are deceased. The first obvious answer is obituaries, but I want a quick and easy way to find those obituaries.

Back in 2013 I posted an article on AQWillDo about how to get to AQWillDo from inside AQ. The title is AQWillDo in AQ. It shows how you can use the Internet tab at the top of your AQ screen to access the AQWillDo blog. Here is the pull down menu I see when I click on Internet->Favorite Sites, and scroll down to the bottom of the menu:

If I highlight the AQ Will Do item in the menu then click the Connect button, AQ will instruct my browser to open the AQ Will Do blog. The next two items on the menu will search FindAGrave for the currently highlighted individual. It is the bottom two menu items I want to discuss here.

One of the quickest ways to find an obituary if you don’t know where it is located is to search for it with Google. For example, if I wanted to find the obituary for my father I would go to Google.com in my browser and enter: obituary Clyde McIntyre Utah. In this case I add Utah to the end of the search because my father died here in Utah. If I am unsure of the place of death, I enter: obituary Clyde McIntyre.

When I enter a search in Google, it converts that request to a search string. Here is the string which is produced when I search: obituary Clyde McIntyre.

When I search for: obituary Clyde McIntyre Utah, the search string produced is:

The first search is looking for three terms: obituary, Clyde and McIntyre. The rest of the search was created by Google, and I don’t know what all of it does, so I will not change it. The second search adds the term Utah to the search. If there is a high probibility that the death was in Utah, I would use the second search. If that fails or if I had no reason to suppose the death was in Utah, I would use the first search.

To tell AQ how to do a Google search I would start by copying that search string from the URL box in my browser. Then I would go to AQ and click the Internet tab and select the Favorite Sites menu item. This screen appears:

I am going to add an item to the My Favorite Web Sites menu, so I click on the Add button. This screen appears:

It looks like there is plenty of space to enter a Title, but look at the My Favorite Web Sites screen above and see the result of long names on the menu, and plan accordingly.

The URL box will contain the information AQ will pass to your browser. This information falls into two categories. The first is a Page URL. AQ will pass it directly to your browser. The second is a Search URL. AQ will attempt to place information from your currently selected AQ record into the URL before passing it on to the browser. To do this, AQ will scan the URL looking for codes preceded by %% and followed by %%. When AQ finds one of these codes, it will replace the code and the surrounding %%s with the requested information from your record. While it is possible to place a Death (Burial) Place into the URL, there is no way to use only the State name, so the name of the state, if used, must be hard coded into the URL. The same is true of the word obituary. It must be hard coded because it is not a part of your AQ file. These values are placed into the search string when you first go to your browser and perform a search so that Google will provide you with the correct search string.

In the example above where I searched Google for: obituary Clyde McIntyre, I copied the URL (search string) from that Google search and pasted it into the URL field on the Add/Edit Favorite Site screen. I clicked once on the URL and used the right arrow key to move to the location of the two values which could be found in my record in the AQ file. I replaced the word Clyde with the code %%FN%% (meaning First Name) and I replaced the word McIntyre with the code %%LN%% (meaning Last Name). I clicked the Search this site** box so that AQ would know that it needed to replace these codes with the first name and the Last name, respectively, from the currently selected record in my .aq file.

Note that in some cases, Google places search terms in more than one place in the search string. Be sure that you convert each search term in the search string the code representing it.

Now I can select a person in my file for whom there is no death information, click on the Internet tab, select the Favorite Sites menu item, scroll down and click on the Google Obit (Giv+Sur) item then click the Connect button.

My browser will fill the screen and present the result of my Google search. Here are the first five items returned on that search requested from within AQ:

Here are the first five items returned with the search from inside AQ with Utah hard coded in the URL:

If this is unclear, please leave a comment.

Protect the Living

Get rid of all those pesky living people!

Continue reading

State of Confusion

In the Yahoo Group [AncestralQuest] an interesting question was asked this morning.

I’m attempting to identify all of my ancestors who have been born, lived, married or died in a particular state.  How do I generate such a list?

There are two general approaches to this problem.
1. Use the Contains operator.
2. Query the State position within the place name.

Each of these methods can be problematic, but for different reasons. Let’s start by deciding which of the two methods we will use, and why we will use it.

My years as a volunteer at the Ogden FamilySearch Library have convinced me that most people either are not aware of the advice Gaylon Findlay gave about creating place names in Ancestral Quest, or they have chosen to ignore that advice. He suggested that if we want to be able to use the ability of AQ to select particular groups of places for events in the records, we will need to construct place names in the following format:

City, County, State or Province, Country.

It seems like an easy task, but after viewing many files while trying to help others, I have seen three deviations from this format which appear consistently:

1. Cemetery, City, County, State, Country
2. Church, City, County, State, Country
3. Hospital, City, County, State, Country

AQ will accept these formats for place names and report them faithfully but at this point, the ability to select by position in the place name is lost.

It is the comma which defines the position within the place name. Everything up to the first comma is considered by AQ to be the City for selection purposes. Everything after the first comma and up to the second comma is in the county field. Everything after the second comma and up to the third comma is the state or province, and everything after the third comma, including other commas, is the country.

It is possible to have retained part of the positional representation by using these formats:

1. City, County, State, Country, Cemetery
2. City, County, State, Country, Church
3. City, County, State, Country, Hospital

It would still be impossible to identify countries this way because the country name would also have contained the name of the Cemetery, Church or Hospital.

This is where logic would tell us to use the Contains operator since it doesn’t depend on the position of the state name in the place name.

Let’s start our report using the Contains method. We would begin by building a Custom Report with the fields we want to examine.

When the fields and sorting order have been determined, click on the Select button.

It is at this point that we will go to the Advanced Filter/Focus and tell AQ to select any record that contains our desired state name in any place name.

Highlight the Any Place field and use the > button to push it into the Current Filter.

Since we are not using positional notation, click on the Full Place radio button. Select Contains from the pull-down window. Enter the name of the state you want to select, and click the OK button.

Our Current Filter looks good, so click on the OK button.

AQ tells us how many records were selected, and we click the OK button.

If we are printing to a PDF file, we click Print, otherwise click Preview. As you examine the report you may notice records which have no place names within Utah or your selected state. How can that be?

Counties and cities across the USA are named after states. Many have their own state name, but this would not be a problem since that’s the state we wanted anyway. The problem is that many counties and cities are named after states other than their own. Here is a list of states that could appear on your list if you select a state which has the name of a county or city equal to or containing the name you selected. This list does not show such places as Kiowa County in Arkansas and Kansas, and it does not show cities with multiple word names.

In the following list, you will see the states in alphabetical order. To the right of the state name, you will see either the name of a county or a city in that state which has the name of a different state.

Here is the list:

If you have followed the advice given as to how to form place names, you can instead follow the same procedure as before up to this place:

Here you would click on the 3 (State) radio button, select Matches from the pull-down window, Enter the name of the desired state, and click OK. If your place names are all built correctly, you will get only the records you wanted.

Suggestions/Questions about AQ Will Do or Subjects discussed here? Click the Comment tab. I would like to hear from you!

What is CSV?

 

OK, so What is CSV?

CSV is an acronym for Comma Separated Values. They don’t look very good as a report, but your spreadsheet will love them.

The idea for this lesson came from a comment I received today on AQWillDo. The comment asked how to create a CSV file because CSV doesn’t appear anywhere on the Reports and Charts screen. There are a few ways to get AQ to create a CSV. The most obscure way I found was as the output from a database compare. I’ll let you figure that one out on your own. (Hint: Look up CSV in the AQ 15 User Manual)  The easier way, and probably the way you are most likely to use is to create a Comma Separated Values file from a Custom Report.

Here is part of a CSV file I created to experiment with how it all works. I learned a few things while I did that experiment, and you may as well see what I learned.

Above is a CSV report of some of the people in my file who were born in 1845. To get this report I started a Custom Report where I selected the RIN and Surname, Given Names as the two fields to place on the report. I sorted the report in ascending order by RIN. I clicked the Select button then the Define button to tell AQ which records I wanted in the report. I selected those born in the Range 1 Jan 1845 to 31 Dec 1845. When I returned to the Reports and Charts screen I clicked on the Text File (.txt) radio button. That is what created my output in the CSV file format. Note that AQ appends the .txt file name extension, and not .csv. That will not stop your spreadsheet from reading the file.

Above is the same report when the destination is Printer/Screen. The major differences are that the CSV version shows each field in quotes, and a comma separates the two fields on each line. Notice also that in the CSV version the names Brown through Marsden do not line up with Harrison through Kirkham. This is because some of the RIN numbers are three characters long and others are four characters long. This shift doesn’t happen in the Printer/Screen version because you format the spacing as you select the fields, if not actively, then by default.

You may be asking why the comma between the surname and the given names doesn’t cause the CSV file to have three fields instead of just two. That is what the quotes around each field prevent.

Suggestions/Questions about AQ Will Do or Subjects discussed here? Click the Comment tab. I would like to hear from you!